Tuesday, June 13, 2017

White Racism Black Distrust and Crime




If you watch the TV news it would seem like African Americans (black People) kill each other every day.   Usually it is the lower income African Americans that kill each other.  Their crime and murders seem like they are impossible to stop.  When you don’t love yourself it’s easy to hurt, steal, and kill someone who looks like you.  

African Americans as a group rage and lament about White racism but rarely talk about in public about our collective mild self-hated and distrust of each other.  Most of us don’t want to go there, and they need to go there.  Drive thought the Black community and you will see the manifestation of our distrust and self-hate.  You will see many small businesses run by Koreans, Arabs, and other Americans.  You will see Black men hanging out looking very much unemployed.   Some are lazy, some do not have a work ethic, and most have not been educated or trained for jobs that are in demand.  

The activist and academics will argue the root cause of most of the ills in the African American community is White supremacy.   That White racism and discrimination created the self hatred, distrust, and tribalism that plague the African American community.  Most of us understand that so the challenge is to figure out how to build trust among African Americans.   The activist and academics need to figure out how to create and sustain crime free neighborhoods for low income African Americans.

African American (Black) activist, academics, preachers, politicians, and others who believe Black lives really matter should focus less on White racism and more ending the distrust among African Americans.

Marc Sims
Chicago



THE PEOPLE IN THE HOOD WHO ARE LEFT BEHIND 
Unless there are government intervention, philanthropic intervention, behavioral intervention, nothing is going to change.
Henry Louis Gates Jr.
 

Monday, June 5, 2017

I Was Not Offended By Bill Maher’s Use Of The “N Word”






Bill Maher should not have used the “N Word”.  The controversy is a reminder we have not reconciled our past and present racial injustices against African Americans.

I'm a descendant of America’s slaves and I was not offended by Bill Maher’s use of the “N Word” and I thought his bad joke was funny. There was a time when I would have responded to someone asking me to "work in the fields"; I’m a house “N Word”, I am not a field “N Word”.

Many years ago the movement to abolish the use of the “N Word” has stop me from saying it.  Now I occasionally say Negro as a term of endearment or as a pejorative when needed.

Bill Maher has a history of being publicly incorrect.  Mr. Maher should tone down his incorrectness a little, and the American public should grow up a lot.

Marc Sims
Chicago

Bill Maher used the N-word on his show, HBO calls it 'completely inexcusable'

Saturday, May 13, 2017

The Powerlessness of African Americans (Black People)








Dr. Amos Wilson On Power (3 minutes)
Just read the transcript and watch just this part of the video.





Ultimately even when we talk about so-called black on black violence or where we talk about the mis-education of our children or many of the other problems that we talk so much about you must come to recognize that to a very
great extent these problems flow from our powerlessness as people they fall from the fact that we have not
developed the power to change our circumstances
and that we will not change our circumstances until we develop real power there's no other way around it trying to get other people to have goodwill and live between sisters and brothers ain't going to work I'm telling you it's not going to do it you got to have power to even get them to believe
that powerful people don't pay much attention to the sermons of the powerless now preaching and ranting and
raving that those other folk but it's not going to have much influence on their behavior why should they pay your inattention you don't represent anything
okay so you gotta have power even convinced them to love you to be brotherly and to be sisterly why should I
be sisterly to you these what does it mean you can't do anything to me that's what they say you can't do anything for me so what's the point why should I love you what I have a game about nothing here yeah sorry a lot of us you know think that we can just preach the enemy into submission ain't gonna happen but if you got some power behind what you're saying things happen you see people listen to powerful people don't they if we want to be heard if by people have a different message if African people have a different message a different philosophy and ideology then African people must back that ideology up with power but as long as you don't have any power your message can it be as beautiful and it's wonderful that you want it to be nobody's going to hear you know that's going to pay you in mind.
Dr. Amos Wilson
You Tube Transcript